Do I have something in my {falcon} teeth?
The juvenile falcon is back again.  This time she was trapped underneath a dome off the 40th floor.  We aren’t sure how long the bird was trapped but she is thin.  We hope to put some weight back on her and then get her back uptown.  Luckily, she has no problem eating.
Third time’s the charm, right? Right…

Do I have something in my {falcon} teeth?

The juvenile falcon is back again.  This time she was trapped underneath a dome off the 40th floor.  We aren’t sure how long the bird was trapped but she is thin.  We hope to put some weight back on her and then get her back uptown.  Luckily, she has no problem eating.

Third time’s the charm, right? Right…

We have admitted 52 raptors in the past two weeks.  And surprisingly most have been adults.  Here are a few of our more recent intakes:

1) juvenile black vulture patient #18120, more than likely a true orphan.  this bird is extremely emaciated but seems to be hanging in there.

2) juvenile red-tailed hawk patient #18130, soft tissue damage due to electrocution

3) adult great horned owl patient #18128, fractured humerus and emaciation. we plan to surgically repair the fracture tomorrow morning. when this bird was admitted, a significant portion of his humerus was exposed and contaminated, but luckily it was healthy.  this owl is so feisty that she must be guaranteed to survive.  

Yesterday, we returned the juvenile falcon to its nest site on the 40th floor of One Wells Fargo Center in Uptown Charlotte. We were hesitate about re-nesting her as the siblings were no longer in the nest and the parents had not been seen for a few days.  Luckily, the father came back shortly after we placed the juvenile at the nest site.  Here is a photo that was taken this morning of the male feeding her.  You can even see the toe that we amputated in the photo (the talon is missing).  The juvenile has the blue feet and the adult has the yellow feet.  

Yesterday, we returned the juvenile falcon to its nest site on the 40th floor of One Wells Fargo Center in Uptown Charlotte. We were hesitate about re-nesting her as the siblings were no longer in the nest and the parents had not been seen for a few days.  Luckily, the father came back shortly after we placed the juvenile at the nest site.  Here is a photo that was taken this morning of the male feeding her.  You can even see the toe that we amputated in the photo (the talon is missing).  The juvenile has the blue feet and the adult has the yellow feet.  

You know that it’s a good day when you admit two falcons within a couple of hours.  Both are juveniles and both are breathtakingly gorgeous.

The first, a peregrine, was found in downtown (Uptown) Charlotte.  He has a partially amputated toe that we plan to fully amputate and clean up tomorrow.  We hope to re-nest him as soon as possible.  Luckily, he has transitioned to his new temporary home easily…he was eating within 5 minutes.  You’d think the change of scenery (from skyscrapers to a pet kennel) would be a little more stressful.  

The second, an American kestrel, is a healthy orphan.  Her nest site has not been found.

How many people does it take to place a GPS tracking device on a bald eagle?  A lot, it seems.  Actually, more were there to watch than to assist.  This doesn’t happen every day.  Or every year.  We are very lucky.  

Thanks to our partnership with NC State University and the NC Museum of Natural History, we were able to place a transmitter on juvenile bald eagle patient #17922.  Once released, you will be able to track the bird’s movement through www.movebank.org.  More details to come.